August NOVA Episodes

PBS' premier science series helps viewers of all ages explore the science
behind the headlines. Along the way, NOVA programs demystify science
and technology, and highlight the people involved in scientific pursuits.

Sponsored by:
SAME
 

NOVA Feature

Australia’s First 4 Billion Years:
Life Explodes

How did life storm the beaches and dominate planet Earth? Ancient Australian fossils offer clues. While the oceans were teeming, the world above the waves remained an almost lifeless wasteland—until the Silurian period, when the conquest of the land began. Host Richard Smith introduces Earth’s forgotten pioneers: the scuttling arthropod armies that invaded the shores and the waves of green revolutionaries whose battle for the light pushed plant life across the face of a barren continent.

Sunday, August 3 at 7:00pm.
Thursday, August 7 at 11:00pm.

 

NOVA Feature

Australia’s First 4 Billion Years: Monsters

Host Richard Smith comes face-to-face with the previously unknown reptilian rulers of prehistoric Australia. NOVA resurrects the giants that stalked the land and discovers that some of them were among the largest ever to have walked the Earth. Others were some of the most dangerous. In the dry desert heart, scientists unearth an ancient inland ocean, full of sea monsters. But reptiles did not have the world all to themselves. Mammals like the enigmatic platypus lived alongside them, ready for their day in the sun.

Sunday, August 17 at 7:00pm.
Thursday, August 21 at 11:00pm.

 

NOVA Feature

Australia’s First 4 Billion Years: Strange Creatures

Australia’s many unusual creatures, like the kangaroo and the cassowary, tell a tale of isolation, change and resilience. Australia’s long history has seen mountains rise and fall, seas come and go, and whole kingdoms of life triumph and disappear. In this final episode, NOVA races down the last 65 million years to the present day.

Sunday, August 24 at 7:00pm.
Thursday, August 28 at 11:00pm.

 

NOVA Feature

Finding Life Beyond Earth:
Are We Alone?

We used to think our neighboring planets and moons were fairly boring—mostly cold, dead rocks where life could never take hold. Today, however, the solar system looks wilder than we ever imagined. Powerful telescopes and unmanned space missions have revealed a wide range of dynamic environments—atmospheres thick with organic molecules, active volcanoes and vast saltwater oceans. This ongoing revolution is forcing scientists to expand their ideas about what kinds of worlds could support life.

Sunday, August 31 at 7:00pm.
Thursday, September 4 at 11:00pm.


NOVA is underwritten by The Rock Island Post of Society of American Military Engineers.

SAME